The Samovar

Notice anything about this postcard?

Gary - 5/31/2008 at 16:30

I place this here hoping to generate some dialog about what, who, where, etc. An estimated value for this card is $150-$200.


:wow:

//front of card



warlocfront.jpg - 38kB

Back of card

Gary - 5/31/2008 at 16:31





warlocback.jpg - 73kB

abelikow - 5/31/2008 at 17:00

This is a French post card, made by one of the Reutlinger's family. You can find more information about this familiy and their post cards on: http://www.topicalpostcards.com/Postcard%20History/Postcard%...
Bets regards

abelikow - 5/31/2008 at 17:02

BY the way...$ 150/200? I think it's a little expensive price for it.

Gary - 5/31/2008 at 17:09

Quote:
Originally posted by abelikow
BY the way...$ 150/200? I think it's a little expensive price for it.


Why?

abelikow - 5/31/2008 at 17:26

Average prices for Reutlinger's postcards is between $ 10 to 30, plus the stamp value. Has this stamp or the cancell something special?

Unhinged - 5/31/2008 at 17:47

As someone who knows next to nothing about postal history, I'm wondering why all the UPU text was crossed out. Is there a known reason, or did someone just not like the UPU?

Gary - 5/31/2008 at 17:47

How many 1-kop. uses can you record?

Lacplesis - 6/1/2008 at 09:11

Quote:
Originally posted by Unhinged
I'm wondering why all the UPU text was crossed out. Is there a known reason, or did someone just not like the UPU?


Not the UPU was target of the crossing out, but the designation "postcard"...
This counts as a printed matter (less the 5 greeting words). Anyhow, not only that it is a local printed matter rate, the holiday special 1kop rate could probably also apply in catholic poland?

I think I have 3 or 4 holiday rate cards in my collection (easter and new years day) and 1 local wrapper with 1kop rate franking.

So my answer would be: Rare because of catholic christmas holiday rate, only applied in poland?

Gary - 6/1/2008 at 17:15

Printed matter is one thing. Internal post from/to within the same location sent like a business card or simple greeting for 1-kop. is not easy to find, but they do exist. The postcard here is of foreign origin. So what? There are many examples of this. There is no place to place any message, unless you write on the young lady on the front.

Gary - 6/2/2008 at 11:09

Saturday, 1 April 1906 was a public holiday.

Gary - 6/2/2008 at 17:26

Well, the original question was about one card in particular. However, I join Arne in showing a few examples. If we want to show more, perhaps a new thread should be created?

I'll stay within Moscow.

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187-.jpg - 29kB

Gary - 6/2/2008 at 17:27

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1893-1-kop-wrapper.jpg - 35kB

Gary - 6/2/2008 at 17:28

//#3



1895-1-kop-wrapper.jpg - 41kB

Gary - 6/2/2008 at 17:28

//#4



1896-1-kop-printed-matter.jpg - 45kB

Gary - 6/2/2008 at 17:29

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1897.jpg - 30kB

Gary - 6/2/2008 at 17:30

//#6



1902-1-kop-printed-matter.jpg - 54kB

Gary - 6/2/2008 at 17:31

//#7



1909.jpg - 99kB

msmike - 7/22/2008 at 03:39

Gary,

The first card was commonly called a bride's card. It was send to the prospective groom during the Christmas holidays as familys would determine marriage contracts. For some reason, it was the woman's picture sent more often than the man's. Remember men married for money while women married for prestige. Many times the contract was made without the bride or groom having never met.

I tend to believe this from the woman's style of pose, style of dress and the overall style of card.

Lacplesis - 7/22/2008 at 04:08

They did send french opera-star pin-up cards to the groom???? For what purpose???

http://www.historicopera.com/jearly_reutlinger_page1.htm