The Samovar
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: End of Zemstvo post ?
leamphil
Collective Farmer
*




Posts: 8
Registered: 1/28/2004
Location: Leamington Spa, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood.

[*] posted on 4/24/2007 at 07:57
End of Zemstvo post ?


I read in the Faberge catalogue & elsewhere that "following the October Revolution in 1917 all Rural District post offices were closed down."

Can anyone please give more detail on what happened ? Was there just no more local post service (in the aftermath of the Revolution) or did the Imperial post service (eventually ?) take over the local services ?




Regards,
Nick Bridgwater
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Alep
Major Philatelist
***




Posts: 388
Registered: 5/21/2005
Location: Estonia
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4/24/2007 at 12:11


The Zemstvo administrations, inc. the post, were not closed down just after the October Revolution. This happened later, during 1918. However, the former Zemstvo posts were functioning locally in some regions, sometimes under the name of Soviet post. They issued also stamps, e.g. in the Perm and Cherdyn districts of Perm province; during 1919 under the Kolchak's administration, Zemstvos in the Urals were restored and the post continued functioning. Also the Zemstvo posts were functioning and even stamps issued in 1918-19 in some areas of Ukraine under the government of Skoropadski and, later, the 'White' Volunteers Army.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
David Jay
Major Philatelist
***




Posts: 465
Registered: 1/24/2007
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4/24/2007 at 15:47


As a related question, I have wondered about the closing or absorption into the main postal system of the Volostnoe Pravlenie (VP) offices (and all the other offices with the same functions such as Pocht. Operatsia) at about this time. These offices were apparently staffed by local officials, not government bureaucrats. I've heard that the Postal Administration tended to establish VP offices in places where the Zemstvo offices were found profitable. While one sees VP postmarks right through the period from 1917 to 1924 or so, most of these are "fossil", meaning that the offices using them had changed status but not postmarks. (This is evident already on pre-1917 registered letters, when the post mark and reg'y label show different names or status). Still, I've not seen an official date for the demise of these offices. It is perhaps indicative that there are apparently no new such offices after 1917.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
howard
Major Philatelist
***




Posts: 161
Registered: 2/6/2003
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood.

[*] posted on 4/24/2007 at 21:06


Over 2000 volostnoe pravlenie (and related) offices were closed or converted to ordinary postal branch offices (otdelenie) between late 1915 and early 1917, according to the first official supplement to the 1916 post office list. These events were also chronicled in the newspaper Pravitelstvennyi Vestnik.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
achlenov
Banned





Posts: 470
Registered: 5/16/2004
Location: California
Member Is Offline

Mood: Optimistic

[*] posted on 4/25/2007 at 04:19


Fascintating! Are there any articles on this subject?
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Alep
Major Philatelist
***




Posts: 388
Registered: 5/21/2005
Location: Estonia
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4/25/2007 at 07:44


Quote:
Originally posted by howard
Over 2000 volostnoe pravlenie (and related) offices were closed or converted to ordinary postal branch offices (otdelenie) between late 1915 and early 1917, according to the first official supplement to the 1916 post office list. These events were also chronicled in the newspaper Pravitelstvennyi Vestnik.

This process was continued in 1918 with the remaining volostnoe pravlenie agencies. The last ones were closed down probably in 1922-23 when a drastic reduction of the postal network took place in the frames of the New Economic Policy (NEP). Although the administrative division to gubernias, uezds and volosts still persisted, these postal agencies were functioning at the volost' Soviets rather than 'pravlenies' while using the old cancellers.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
leamphil
Collective Farmer
*




Posts: 8
Registered: 1/28/2004
Location: Leamington Spa, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood.

[*] posted on 4/27/2007 at 13:03


To expose my ignorance, what are "VP", "Pocht. Operatsia", "otdelenie" and "gubernias, uezds and volosts" ? ... is there any recommended reading (in english) to improve my situation ?

... I have a Russian to English dictionary but it only works on Cyrillic characters (& I have enough trouble working out what the character order for these is !) :study




Regards,
Nick Bridgwater
View user's profile View All Posts By User
David Jay
Major Philatelist
***




Posts: 465
Registered: 1/24/2007
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4/27/2007 at 13:59


There was a good article in a recent British Society of Russian Philately Journal (I think)
by Alexander Epstein on the various obscure types of post offices that the imperial post used to serve the huge, remote Russian hinterland. The Kiryushkin and Robinson book on Russian postmarks summarizes much of this info and has maps. David Skipton's translation of Bazielvich (a Rossica book) provides a great deal of information.
To summarize that which I don't fully understand myself, gubernias are roughly provinces. There were also Oblasts, regions that were under military rule rougly parallel to Gubernias. An uezd is an administrative district within a gubernia or oblast, some of which were huge and poorly populated. Perhaps an American county might be somewhat analogous. A Volost is more like a township within an uezd. The Volostnoe Pravlenie offices were set up first in Siberia as a successful experiment in rural post offices under imperial direction, in contrast to the zemstvo offices that were under local control. Often the VP offices were located in the same sorts of local offices used by zemstvos, and sometimes replaced zemstvo offices, if enough mail was handled.
There were also very remote areas that lacked the uezd apparatus (e.g., in Yakutia) so VP-like offices were established with the name of Pocht. Operatsia. This term seems, however, to have been a general one, subsuming the various types of non-zemstvo VP-like rural offices. For example, the wax seals on VP money letters usually say "Pocht Operatsia". There are a lot of other names used for offices with the same function as VP offices, because they were located somewhere else (e.g., at an alien administration office) or served a particular part of the population (e.g., a Cossack area, Khytor Pravlenie), or were located in some particular part of the empire (Gminoe Pravlenie offices in Poland). Since rural russia was served by at least 5
types of offices in imperial times -- this results is fascinating, if obscure postal history. Types of rural offices:
1) Post stations
2) The Wendische Kreise Post in Wenden
3) the zemstvo post
4) VP offices and related
5) Post Stanitsa at railroad stops (which were part of the imperial post, not the railroad post).
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Alep
Major Philatelist
***




Posts: 388
Registered: 5/21/2005
Location: Estonia
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4/28/2007 at 01:47


More precisely: the pertinent article by Alexander Epstein was published in Journal of Classical Russian Philately # 9, December 2003, 9-31.
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top

Powered by the Rossica Society
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2017 The XMB Group
[Queries: 17]