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Author: Subject: 1926 Moscow to Berlin
jlechtanski
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[*] posted on 10/5/2007 at 11:11
1926 Moscow to Berlin


Here is a cover from Moscow to Berlin from Dec 1926. It is franked 28k at the 14k + 14k registered letter rate set 1 Oct 1925.

What is the purpose of the blue overprint on the registration label?



1926 Registered Moscow to Berlin Back.jpg - 49kB1926 Registered Moscow to Berlin.jpg - 72kB
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Gary
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[*] posted on 10/5/2007 at 11:33


Possibly indicates the registration label belonged to an ekspeditsiya (1st?) at the Main Post Office.;)
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jlechtanski
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[*] posted on 10/5/2007 at 16:14


I thought it was a "Z" as in zakaznoe rather than an "E" as in ekspeditsiya. A registration label with just the "R" would have been proper for an international letter (UPU standard). On second look I see that I was wrong.

The postmark looks like it could be something like "MOSKVA 1 EkSP." That would indicate that the 1st Ekspekitsiya was responsible for outgoing international mail at that time.
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Gary
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[*] posted on 10/10/2007 at 11:43


Getting old and the eyes are fading, but the letter still look like "Eh" to me:(
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Gary
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[*] posted on 10/10/2007 at 17:00


Should we also presume that nothing changed relative to the postal system and it was business as usual? All examples listed except the original are from the Empire days. The postmarks for Moscow did undergo changes, but perhaps the registration labels did not? Did the registration label on the 1926 cover wrinkle the cover and the stamps did not? Must be the glue on the back of the items?

And as usual for the old man here, where does it say the cover is registered, if it does, other than on the label used? Can we definitely confirm the label was placed on the cover in 1926 by the addressee or the postal clerk?
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jlechtanski
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[*] posted on 10/11/2007 at 15:47


As I said before, I now think it is an "eh" rather than a "zeh."

If it is a "zeh," 9th letter of the Russian alphabet, that would mean that this registration label came from the 9th sheet of labels used that day or somewhere between 9000 and 9999. That's a lot of registered mail.

It it is an "eh," somewhere near the end of the alphabet, that would seem like just too much registered mail to be possible.

Unfortunately, the letter was clipped at the top when opening it. You can barely see that a line was drawn on the envelope where the cut was made. ZAKAZNOE may have been written at the top of the envelope.
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Gary
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[*] posted on 10/11/2007 at 16:50


I am still waiting to see more evidence that the Soviets retained the Imperial postal forms and labels. All of the examples shown here, except for the original illustration, are not from the Soviet era, at least for Moscow.:study
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tbeberger
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[*] posted on 10/13/2007 at 04:00


@ Gary
Unfortunately I do not collect RSFSR and early USSR postal history but I know that especially in the first tough years the postal administration used all the devices they could find to keep the postal system running. The political system changed but not the habits of the postal clerks. They were using czaristic stamps (o.k., not in 1926) why shouldn't they handle the mail not the way they have done it in czaristic times?
Of course one cannot prove that this label was not attached on this cover, but the tariff fits to a registered item. However, could this also be a double weight tariff?
I agree that it should be possible to find in the extended collections of the Rossica members some comparable items reflecting the use of letters on registration labels.
Ciao, Thomas Berger
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Gary
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[*] posted on 10/13/2007 at 17:08


We need more examples. Please post.:(
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