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Author: Subject: How much postageż?
241264hsv-fan
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[*] posted on 6/4/2009 at 07:16
How much postageż?


Russian letters to Greece were usually occupied before UPU with additional postage, because the letters were franked only up to the border. How long they practiced it was about what was Greek postage dependent (weight, distance, time)? Who can tell literature, which gives over it exact data?

27.06.1870 correct franked with 30 Kop. and afterfranked with 45 Lepta
15.09.1874 correct franked with 22 Kop. and afterfranked with 90 Lepta
03.01.1875 correct franked with 16 Kop. and afterfranked with 40 Lepta



Ru-Gr17-gr.jpg - 358kBRu-Gr1874kl.jpg - 277kBRu-Gr1875kl.jpg - 448kB
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[*] posted on 6/4/2009 at 07:22


More examples:

04.07.1874 correct franked with 22 Kop. and afterfranked with 40 Lepta to Syra
08.09.1867 correct franked with 34 Kop. and afterfranked with 50 Lepta to Syra
20.09.1868 correct franked with 34 Kop. and afterfranked with 45 Lepta to Syra
09.07.1867 correct franked with 34 Kop. and afterfranked with 65 Lepta to Syra
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ameis33
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[*] posted on 6/4/2009 at 13:32


Very beautiful letters!
I can't answer about postal rates, to Greece in particular. Anyway, i have seen others letters to Greece like yours in the Paolo Bianchi's collection. Perhaps it could be useful for you to take a look at the related auction catalog.
The Paolo Bianchi's collection was sold by investphila last year. You can still download the catalog here
http://www.investphila.com/archivio_cataloghi_pdf.htm
1st June 2008, Imperial russia (1st and 2nd part)
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jlechtanski
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[*] posted on 6/4/2009 at 14:50


The letter to Συρος (the Russian Сира ) looks like it is franked with 80 lepta rather than 90. But it appears that a stamp has fallen off.

It is interesting that they are all routed through Odessa, which makes me think they went by sea to Greece. But the letter to Corfu is endorsed “via Vienna.”

A lot would depend on whether there were a postal treaty between Greece and Russia -- but that is doubtful.

I also notice that the Greek stamps were postmarked in the towns to which they were addressed, rather than a port of entry or border town.
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[*] posted on 6/5/2009 at 02:54


Hello ameis33,
I have this catalogue on my own and it does not really help me.

Hello jlechtanski,
that´s correct. One stamp has fallen off. I look for it but have however very little hope.
The letters were carried over the sea. So the port of entry is such the same as a border town (Pireus and Syra/Siros).
The other one via Vienna was probably carried via Italy(?) but there is no transit mark. There are transit mark “Konstantinople” in greek on the front side and “ΠEIPAIEYΣ/Pireus” transit mark on the back side. You are right that is interesting that it was postmarked in “KERKYRA”. It would be a remarkable way and it is questionable if this letters was carried via Vienna. All letters to Greece I know were carried via Odessa (Black Sea) directly to Greece or via Constantinople. Over Vienna it would be in each case a detour. :study



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jlechtanski
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[*] posted on 6/6/2009 at 15:30


The thought just came to me. Greece being an Eastern Orthodox country, the Greek as well as Russian postmarks on these covers would have Julian dates.

Sure enough, Greece did not adopt the Gregorian calendar until 1 March 1923.

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