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Author: Subject: Moscow - late use of old postmark devices
Gary
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shocked.gif posted on 9/20/2009 at 08:52
Moscow - late use of old postmark devices


The canceling device used on this 1924 cover is the same as the one used during the Empire era.

First, a brief bit of information on Moscow 34th town marks.

Between 1906-1917, the 34th office was listed as a Town Post-Telegraph Office and was located in the Prechistenka district of Moscow on the corner of Gagarinskii and Starokonyushennii (Lanes). No name changes for these lanes is indicated in 1923-24.

In 1922, the 34th office was listed as a (Town) Post-Telegraph Office and was located in the Prechistenka district of Moscow.

In 1923, the 34th office was listed as a Town Office and was located in the Prechistenka district of Moscow.

In 1924-25, the 34th office was listed as a (Town) Post Office and was located in the Prechistenka district of Moscow.

During the empire era, Moscow marks used by the town post offices were of two basic types.

For mail received and sent forward to the Main Post Office, they used CDS marks with a serial letter (or none) on the right side of the mark. 10 July 1907 example shown here has serial letter "a" on the right. This postcard is one that was forwarded to the Main Post Office for delivery out of Moscow. (on left)

For mail sent to them and that they then dispatched for delivery, they used CDS marks with a serial letter on the LEFT and a time of dispatch on the right. These marks are usually accompanied by Town Post arrival/dispatch marks. The hours may even be the same. If not, the Town Post mark is normally earlier than the Town Office dispatch mark. 20 March 1910 example shown here has serial letter "zh" on the left and "9 o'clock" on the right. Note also the Town Post machine mark of 19 March 1910. This postcard is one that came into Moscow. (on right)

10-July-1907-a-left.jpg - 96kB20-March-1910-Zh-left.jpg - 133kB
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Gary
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[*] posted on 9/20/2009 at 08:54
!924 example of Moscow late use


The cover shown here use the postmark for dispatch of mail to the addressee. However, the one from 1924 appears to be used as a cancel for the stamps in mail forwarded to the Main Post Office for delivery out of Moscow. The example shown here has serial letter "zh" on the left and "7 o'clock" on the right. The reverse of the letter is blank. This letter is one that was forwarded for delivery out of Moscow.

Looks like they were a bit slow in completely changing the postal devices used. But we must understand that this is Moscow.

Can we show similar examples for other locations?

27-December-1924-zh-left.jpg - 136kB
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Alep
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[*] posted on 9/21/2009 at 07:10


I believe there was no urgent need in replacement of cancellers which were not in conflict with the modern orthography, e.g. the town office or sub-office cancellers of the type shown here or that shown by Gary.

-174.jpg - 103kB
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Gary
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[*] posted on 9/21/2009 at 08:41


They also took their time with at least the 1st dispatch office. Although this printed commercial envelope shows the modern orthography, the postmark does not.

1DO-1924.jpg - 164kB
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GregMirsky
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[*] posted on 9/22/2009 at 23:09


Here is an example of "late use" of Imperial Russia canceling devices (it is not from Moscow - sorry to polute Moscow thread :) ) - it is Blagoveschensk 02.03.1928 (!). This is REALLY late use. 11 Years after October Revolution... See image attached.

BlagoveschenskCover020328.jpg - 163kB
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Gary
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[*] posted on 9/23/2009 at 04:31


Interesting that it took so long before a device was changed. The Blagoveshchensk mark has two letters that were banned/dropped.
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jlechtanski
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[*] posted on 9/23/2009 at 17:05


РЖИЩЕВЪ КІЕВ. -- Both Rzhischev and Kievskaya are old spellings -- used in 1923.

More striking is the use of old POW cards with old orthography as bank cards. Cost cutting was paramount -- use old cards, old registration labels, old postmark devices until they are gone or become unusable.

POW Card Used as Bank Card - Rzhischev - Front.jpg - 82kB
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Gary
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[*] posted on 9/23/2009 at 17:44


I suspect they were trying to use whatever they could to save money. This is an area that still is wide open for research. Probably not in the latest catalogs since the catalogs do only stamps. :hoho

Postal history is a "thinking" aspect of our hobby. ;)
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