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Author: Subject: Parcel card for insured parcel to Sweden
eja1703
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[*] posted on 8/14/2004 at 12:53
Parcel card for insured parcel to Sweden


I have a parcel card for an insured parcel sent from Orsha to Sweden in 1915. Franked with 104 kopek. What was the postage for the weight and what was the postage for the insurance? Which periods were the these rates valid?
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Gary
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[*] posted on 8/14/2004 at 16:46


Please post a scan of the front of this item. The Russians usually had a "chart/table/check box" in which they would indicate what was what.
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eja1703
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[*] posted on 8/25/2004 at 07:59
Picture


Here comes finally a picture of the front side. The only inetersting on the back is an arrival cancellation from Stockholm

Verdifb Orsha 100.jpg - 25kB
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achlenov
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[*] posted on 8/26/2004 at 12:58


Looks like it was declared at 30 robles for 5kg weight. I don't know the rates, sorry. Did they always fill out international forms in French?
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yozhik
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smile.gif posted on 8/31/2004 at 06:54
French


The use of French originates from the fact that French was, from the middle ages until the 20th century the diplomatic language of Europe. This is also why until the last couple of years official russian transliterations from the cyrillic were made using the french transliteration rather than English. (Eltsin instead of Yeltsin, Elena instead of Yelena, Ekaterina instead of Yekaterina etc.)
Visas and passports are now transliterated according to the English transliteration as English has de-facto replaced French as the common diplomatic language. The change is however slow and I have seen a number of mixed transliterations as old habits die hard.
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Gary
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[*] posted on 3/2/2005 at 18:59


Charly,

Sorry, but I am having a lot of trouble understanding your request.
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howard
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[*] posted on 3/3/2005 at 16:34


According to the 1911 Universal Almanac (Vseobshchii Kalendar), the weight fee for a 5 kg. parcel was 90 kop., and the insurance fee for Sweden was 10 kop. plus 4 kop. more for sea transport.
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oldteddy
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[*] posted on 3/5/2005 at 07:48
Why French?


I think there is a much simpler [and more PHILATELIC] answer to why French. French was and still is the official language of the UPU. English was added as a working language of the International Bureau in 1994. So all forms and documents intended for international use should have French as at least one of the languages. And the card in question is one of those UPU-complied postal forms.
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