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Author: Subject: Address card for a parcel
eja1703
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[*] posted on 3/16/2005 at 15:03
Address card for a parcel


The attached scan is of a adress card for a parcel sent in 1940. It is paid 5 rubles for the weight, when was this postal rate valid. On the back, see second scan, is it stamps with the total value of 1.80 rubles, they are cancelled on the day the parcel was delivered to the addressee. What is this payment for? What is the meaning of the third line on the postal rate table (за трактовую пересылку;).

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eja1703
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[*] posted on 3/16/2005 at 15:04
Scan of the rear side




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oldteddy
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[*] posted on 3/16/2005 at 21:29
Just a guess


The following is just a guess, not based on any documentation or literature.

1: The term "почтовый тракт" is very old and was used back when one of the POSTAL functions was providing horses for travalers. I think in this context it's used as a synonym of DIRECT POSTAL ROUTE. So if delivery of a parcel required transfering it from one "почтовый тракт" to another - postal service charged extra.
2: About the stamps: if to judge by the box in which they affixed "доставка" [delivery] - it's for home delivery. But who affixed them? Post Office?

I hope somebody would give more documented interpretation.
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achlenov
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[*] posted on 3/17/2005 at 00:30


Quite interesting! It appears that both the sender and the receiver were in the recently occupied Poland "Western Belarus". It's amazing how quickly they renamed the streets in Brest!
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eja1703
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[*] posted on 3/26/2005 at 17:51


I have seen on the five other parcel cards that I have from the same time as the above. All have stamps on the back for delivery. But the amount is never specified in the proper fields on the back. The question is how they calculated this delivery fee. The five other parcel cards have the following fees for delivery, 30 kopek, 45 kopek, 75 kopek, 240 kopek and 300 kopek. It looks like more days between arrival of the parcel on the adresee post office and delivery to the adresee gave higher fee. Anyone that has the solution!
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yozhik
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[*] posted on 4/4/2005 at 18:08


It is interesting that the card dates from the occupation period, and seems that the others do too.
IF you knew that the items came from a military man It is quite possible that the parcel represented "liberated" goods being sent home.
It is well known that when the Red Army reached Germany during WW2 that there was a special parcel allowance for each soldier. ;)
does anyone know if a similar concession was granted when the Soviets invaded Poland and the baltics?
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