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Author: Subject: Standard Catalog and Stamps on letter
ameis33
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[*] posted on 5/23/2008 at 14:42
Standard Catalog and Stamps on letter


In my recent posts, in particular this

http://www.rossica.org/Samovar/viewthread.php?tid=1980

and this

http://www.rossica.org/Samovar/viewthread.php?tid=1751

The letters i've posted could be nice, of course, but with not so big value, that's true. Trying to identify the stamps on the standard catalog, i faced stamps with a very low value as used (i.e. #100, 10k of the 19th issue of 1908 and #67, 2k of 13th issue of 1902, which worth a quarter dollar circa used), but with a corresponding high value used on letters (100$ and 50$ respectively).
Is it really so? Are this stamps not so common on letters? Which is your opinion?

BTW! Can someone give me a confirmation.
The stamps of 2k belonging from the block of 9 which you could see in the first of the posts linked above, have a perforation of 14 1/2(1/4): 14 1/2(1/4)
My perforation gauge can't distinguish between 1/2 and 1/4, but of course they're not 3/4. Is it enough to say those stamps belong from the 13th issue of 1902 and not from the 17th of 1905? There are other differences?
The paper is vertically laid.
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jlechtanski
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[*] posted on 5/23/2008 at 16:38


In 1905 the backgrounds for the 1-7k stamps were redrawn. Up until 1905 there were circles at the corners in the background where the values were placed. In 1905 (17th issue) they were omitted.

You can see it best when the background is slightly shifted. I don't think you can see it if the foreground and background circles are perfectly aligned.
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ameis33
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[*] posted on 5/24/2008 at 15:22


I've seen the pictures of the new/old background on the catalog, but i can't see differences on my stamps. Could the perforation be a valid element for the identification?
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jlechtanski
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[*] posted on 5/24/2008 at 20:31


I am used to catalogs with perforations to the nearest 1/2. Zagorsky lists some subtle differences in perforation of the small-size stamps:

14 1/2 x 15 4th - 9th issue
14 1/4 x 14 3/4 10th
14 1/4 x 14 1/2 11th - 13th
14 1/4 x 14 3/4 14th - 19th

Assuming that 14 1/2 is not a misprint, it looks like the issues could be separated by comparing the perforations.

I wonder what the Michel Specialized has to say on perforations?
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Alep
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[*] posted on 5/25/2008 at 12:12


I believe that the same perforator was used starting from the 10th issue. So the dimensions for the 13th issue are merely a misprint, or one can hardly distinguish between 14 1/2 and 14 3/4.
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ameis33
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[*] posted on 6/3/2008 at 16:54


9th issue: 14 1/2 x 15
10th issue: 14 1/4 x 14 3/4
Do you have any trick to apreciate a difference of 1/4 point in both perforations? I'm looking a stamp on a letter sent in june 1888, and i can't discriminate between both perforations. Or there are other details?
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cec71
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[*] posted on 6/4/2008 at 10:43
Measuring perforations to 0.10 to 0.20


Scott via Linn's has a magnificant tool for many measurements called a Scott Multiguage. Perforations can be measured to 0.10 to the high perforations. The measuring lines are very fine and clear facilitating very accurate measurements. Also has a cancellation guage and mm ruler with very clear, fine lines. Have used this to try to separate the two issues.
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ameis33
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[*] posted on 6/4/2008 at 14:33


I think you mean a linear perforation gauge. I've seen them. for some italian stamps (like the 100L of the democratic issue of 1945), where perforation with decimal steps were used (13.1 and 13.9 if i don't mistake), you can't do without. Other people measure the perforation appliyng the matematical formula standing to the definition of the perforation steps itself. (Much more tricky then it appears).
I will consider a linear gauge...
Thank's
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